Rating:

Interpretive Wheel – Analyzing Your Experiences

A Tool for Analyzing the Experiences You Craft

A pie chart cut into quadrants. The top quadrant has a pictogram for "story," the left has a pictogram for "sharing," the right has a pictogram for "learning from others," the bottom has a pictogram for "sticky problem." Below is a screenshot of the first page of the Interpretive rubric.How can you tell if your Audience Centered Experiences are working? You’ll need to pay attention to the small things – how you, your audience, and the resource are each interacting and engaging.

Luckily, a diverse team of interpreters from across the NPS have you covered! They’ve been developing a rubric to use in the field – based on the Interpretive Wheel model – that can help you see what you’re shining at and make your experiences even better.

This ACE Rubric is best filled out by an observer of your program – a peer, friend, supervisor, or coach.

This form debuted in the Summer 2019 interpretive season and is being used at parks across the country to help interpreters grow. Like any of the tools we are using as the craft of interpretation shifts and changes, this form is still a beta draft. If you have feedback or input on how to make the form even better, contact rubric team leads AJ Lapre and Kira Pontius.

Wisdom from the Crowd

Do you want input on your interpretative experiences from all over the National Park Service and beyond? The Interpretation and Education Peer Feedback Community is a dedicated group of interpreters and coaches who love taking a look at your ideas and offering new avenues for exploration. They use tools like this rubric to offer you feedback on what you’ve built so far. You can share anything you’re working on – from the smallest germ of an idea for an audience interaction to your latest ACE exhibit panel drafts.

A pie chart cut into quadrants. The top quadrant has a pictogram for "story," the left has a pictogram for "sharing," the right has a pictogram for "learning from others," the bottom has a pictogram for "sticky problem."

Explore the Interpretive Wheel Model…

Curious to know more about the four elements of the Interpretive Wheel? Want to know how the model maps to the Foundations of Interpretation competencies? Excited to start building your skills in Audience Centered interpretation? Delve deeper into the Interpretive Wheel Model.

Write a Review

  1. We have been using a slightly different version of this rubric this season at my site, and it has been a useful tool for keeping my thoughts organized as a coach. The third page on this document seems extremely helpful, as the version we were given last winter did not have those suggestions and we spent many hours debating how to define “tells a great story” and “tackles a sticky problem”.

    Rating:

  2. This page and associated links is very helpful to me as a coach/supervisor. These pages provide great training in the basics and the associated links lead to the rubric which can be used for peer coaching and for myself. I also like how the wheel is linked to the Foundations and also to associated activities/trainings. The expanded rubric which details what we are looking for for each of the four areas is also helpful to me as an interpreter and also coach. Now…just need to implement!

    Rating:

Arrow pointing upwards. Click this icon to go back to the top of the page.